Thursday, January 25, 2018

Merriam-Webster Word of the Day - Mansuetude



 
WORD OF THE DAY
January 25, 2018
 
 

 
 
Britannica Demystified
mansuetude Audio pronunciation
 
noun | MAN-swih-tood  
 
Definition
 
:
the quality or state of being gentle : meekness, tameness
 
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Did You Know?
 
Mansuetude was first used in English in the 14th century, and it derives from the Latin verb mansuescere, which means "to tame." Mansuescere itself comes from the noun manus (meaning "hand") and the verb suescere ("to accustom" or "to become accustomed"). Unlike manus, which has many English descendants (including manner, emancipate, and manicure), suescere has only a few English progeny. One of them is desuetude, which means "disuse" and comes to us by way of Latin desuescere ("to become unaccustomed"). Two others are custom and accustom, which derive via Anglo-French from Latin consuescere, meaning "to accustom."
 
Britannica Demystified
 
Examples of MANSUETUDE
 
"… he espied over the plateau … the old brown villa itself, rich in memories of one after another of the family of the Antonines. As he approached it, such reminiscences crowded upon him, above all of the life there of the aged Antoninus Pius, in its wonderful mansuetude and calm."
Walter Pater, Marius the Epicurian, 1885
 
"While Barbara was swimming to meet the dawn, Miltoun was bathing in those waters of mansuetude and truth which roll from wall to wall in the British House of Commons."
John Galsworthy, The Patrician, 1911
 
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