February 27, 2013

Letter to the Editor: Does Malloy really think Seniors Don't Exist?

Malloy is trying to eliminate the Permanent Commission on the Status of Women and five other commissions in order to create a new agency that would be called the Commission on Citizen Advocacy.
The six commissions currently have a combined 26 employees, while Malloy's new entity would have 18 and save more than $1.6 million.
- See more at: http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-malloy-commissions-0220-20130219,0,7114677.story#sthash.qr2oIyDl.dpuf
Letter to the Middletown Insider

Is it true that the Malloy "administration" is planning to eliminate the Commission on Aging?  The largest growing segment of the Connecticut's  population are seniors and that idiot says that we don't exist.

 Ed Dypa, Middletown Resident
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Gov. Malloy dislikes seniors, because
he will never be one.
Dear Mr. Dypa,
Thank you for your letter. To respond we heard Govenor Dannel  Malloy doesn't age and is in fact a non human android. In an effort not to expose this fact he has ordered that all Democratic Mayors ignore older citizens. 

Remember the special meeting last year where citizens packed the Council Chambers to advocate for the Senior Center Project at Eckersley Hall? Mayor Drew lied saying he was never opposed to such a plan when in fact he was? Well that meeting was almost was never broadcast. In fact, certain people in charge told people charged with taping that the equipment was malfunctioning, but in fact it was not. So now it all makes sense!
According to their website, the Connecticut Commission on Aging is a non-partisan state agency of the CT General Assembly. The Commission is charged with preparing our state for the burgeoning aging populations while promoting policies that enhance the lives of the present and future generations of older adults.
The CoA is comprised of a resourceful team of 21 voting (unpaid) members, 4 part-time professional staff, and volunteers.

The Commission on Aging was created by the CT General Assembly in 1993. The Commission has served as an effective leader in statewide efforts to promote choice, independence and dignity for Connecticut's older adults. Sec. 17b-420. Commission on Aging. Membership. Duties. Authority. Personnel. Agreements with state agencies. (a) There is established a Commission on Aging composed of twenty-one voting members.

By 2030, Connecticut's over-65 population is expected to grow by more than 64 percent, while its younger population shrinks, according to the Connecticut Commission on Aging, which sponsored the forum with the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities.

According to Gov. Malloy's proposed budget, the Commission on Aging and 5 other commissions such as those for Asians, Latinos, African Americans, and Women's Issues would be combined into a single entity. Currently there are 28 employees which would be cut to 18. It was reported that this is a $1.6 million dollar savings. More information is available in the article from the Hartford Courant here: http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-malloy-commissions-0220-20130219,0,7114677.story


While the other 5 commissions are by definition "Identity Political Groups," a commission on aging is arguably not. Aging, unlike gender, ethnicity, religion, race, sexual orientation, is a common denominator among human beings. If we are to continue living, we are all to age. If we are to continue living, most will not change race. While some feel identity political groups are essential to raising social awareness as a collective consciousness and are/were inherent in gaining equality for those particularly effected, opponents see such groups as ways to drive wedges between human beings.  Do these groups marginalize or aid in cohesive decision making and civil rights for all?

Rep. Matt Lesser newest Latino
to join Black and Latino Caucus
Whether special interest groups divide or bring people together is another argument. By definition, however, the Commission on Aging does not belong among them as it is a universal condition. There is an the argument that the elimination of some of these identity based political special interest commissions and consolidation into a single entity to advocate for all social minority type groups is logical in balancing a budget. However, if the logic is to advocate for  a wider range of people, then  the elimination of the Commission of Aging is illogical; such an elimination does not fit the precedent being followed.  The Commission on Children is not being lumped in and consolidated is it?? Rep. Joe Serra (D) chairs the Committee on Aging, what he is doing to advocate for seniors in the case of the commission's elimination ?

Speaking of Identity Politics, Representative Matt Lesser (D), now serving his third term decided today that he was in fact Latino and has asked to join the Black and Latino Caucus. While no one is arguing with who is more Latino than who, or what makes one Latino, is is odd that only NOW is Lesser "coming out" to the public so to speak wanting to publicly identify himself with a particular ethnic minority. Why not before? Is Lesser challenging stereotypes or pandering for votes? It appears that Lesser's joining of this group is his attempt to identify with a particular demographic and gain more votes rather than aide in their plight.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Please. The state is broke! We need to eliminate these commisions and the overpaid Hacks who have state jobs on them. Why do some people not understnd this? The Middletown Senior center is an expense we cannot afford, for a select few.

Anonymous said...

To the first poster: you have NO idea what you are talking about. In Middletown the population of citizens who are 60+ is over 8,000 - or roughly 1/5 of the total population. This is not a "select few". This is a number that will continue to grow rapidly over the next 10-15 years as the "Baby Boomers" come of age.

Anonymous said...

For a select few Do you realize the seniors are the largest growing population in our state and city. The new Senior center will be a place for seniors to gather for years to come.

Anonymous said...

Let's send Matt a few letters in Spanish and see if he replies back, in Spanish!